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Germaine Regnier

tennis player
Full name: Anne Germaine Regnier
Alias: Germaine Golding
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Bio Mademoiselle Regnier's first spotlight came in the 1910 French Nationals final. She lost in a close final to Jeanne Matthey 1-6 6-1 9-7.In 1914 Germaine, now Madame Golding was the finalist at the World Hard Court Championships, the biggest clay-court event of her era. She lost to 15-year-old Suzanne Lenglen 6-2 6-1-a player she was never destined to defeat. Golding tried to dictate play with her forehand, but usually made an error after 3 or 4 shots.
War from 1914 to 1918 interrupted her tennis, though perhaps not totally, for we know she played a tournament at Gstaad in 1917.

After World War I, she was a finalist at the French national championships three times in a row from 1921, but lost to Lenglen each time. The 1923 final was the most intriguing. Golding actually led 4-0 in the second set when Lenglen righted herself and swept the next 6 games. The crowd believed that Golding had been robbed on a line call. As a result they actually booed Suzanne, something unheard of in France. The diva looked to be considering default until Papa ordered her to continue.

Partnering with Suzanne Lenglen, Germaine captured the 1921 World Hard Court in doubles. This was her 2nd World Hardcourt Championship, having won the Mixed with William Laurentz in 1920.
Her biggest title was the 1922 World Covered Court Championships in St Moritz, Switzerland. Victories in the doubles and mixed doubles gave her a a rare "triple crown". There were 3 "World" Championships-Covered Courts (Indoors), Hard Courts (on clay) and on Grass (Wimbledon).
Golding limited her tennis to continental Europe for the most part,
entering Wimbledon only once (in 1923)-she defaulted without striking a ball.
At the 1924 Summer Olympics at Paris, she lost in the semifinals against Helen Wills as well as the following match for bronze against Kathleen McKane.
After the French championships were opened for international players in 1925, Golding had problems to compete. She played in Paris for the last time in 1933, where she lost to Sylvie Jung Henrotin in the second round.

Some sources suggest she is English. There is no evidence for this, not in her name, nor in the fact that her tennis was almost exclusively on the continent. There is a chance her husband may have been George Golding, an Englishman who entered Wimbledon from 1921 to 1926. At present, there is no direct evidence for this theory.

A competent baseliner with a strong forehand, Golding's serve had a large "cut", or slice, that made a strange bounce on impact and took some getting used to. By contrast, her backhand was a weakness the better of players could exploit.
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